Lifestyle

Zoom it

June 12, 2020

We are living through a time where our norm has shifted. Everything we did before has changed shape.

For those of us with young children, instead of dropping them off at school or nursery in the morning and going to work, we try to pry ourselves away and step into make-shift offices. The reality of homeworking for many with kids though, means having children playing close by or sitting at a table with them trying to manage home-schooling while working (one, inevitably, falls by the wayside).

Some people are enjoying having more time with their partners, more time for themselves and/or with their children. Others are extremely stressed as they’re under financial hardship or finding it impossible to compartmentalize work and home life, or are on their own, feeling lonely, or are furloughed from work so struggling to find structure. Most, no matter their personal situation, are feeling a variety of conflicting emotions each day.

Whatever your scenario, it’s different than usual in at least some significant ways, and most people are thinking about what’s really important to them. One thing most of us need to really thrive is human interaction. We are now being forced to lead lives where we can’t feel the warmth of our friends close at hand. Companies like Zoom and Houseparty (to name two especially popular ones) have created a virtual alternative to help us stay connected and make the separation less acute.

Zoom is also revolutionising the interior design business. You might think that seemingly frivolous things like having a pretty home are not important in a time of economic oblivion and sadness, but it is more important than ever. Feeling good at home and being surrounded by things that inspire and make you feel relaxed are essential to one’s overall wellbeing. Whether we live or die is not the ultimate question, it is how we get to spend our time while we are here that is important.

Luxury living room interior design by Ana Engelhorn

So, let me tell you how we are using Zoom to help our clients. While we are not able to meet personally, we can have face-to-face online interactions to help us develop the design brief, get to the bottom of who they are and what they would like to achieve. We can start the design process by sending mood boards, samples and presentations of what we have summarised from the client’s brief. Most importantly, we can get going with the design process, which often can take just as long as the implementation process itself (read more about the two stages in my here).